G650GS Battery Relocation

For future reference.

The battery is a considerable weight mounted high on the machine contributing to the top heavy feel. There are two solutions to this. The first is to fit one of the new Lithium LifePO4 batteries which reduce the weight of the battery from 4 kgs to 0.8 kg and in some cases less, They are also considerably smaller leaving additional space for mounting electrical relays or HID ballasts in the battery box. The second is to relocate the battery to below the seat behind the engine. This step is only possible on the non ABS machines.

Source: Battery Relocation

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9718363_G

RAGBRAI Packing List 2016

Ongoing list, so I don’t forget. Items marked with “B” are carried on bike.

  • Sleeping bag (not just sheets–brrr)9718363_G
  • Pillow
  • Fan
  • GPS
  • Camera, charger, spare batteries
  • Batteries for GPS, fan, lights, etc.
  • Headlamp with red LED (B)
  • Earplugs(!)
  • Road ID
  • Sundry supplements and OTC remedies
  • Sunscreen (B)
  • Protein bars (B)
  • Cooling towel (B)
  • Regular towel (although most showers provide the disposable ones)
  • Phone charger and portable batteries (B)
  • Antibacterial wipes (B)
  • Spare glasses
  • Riding goggles
  • Cycling gloves
  • Sunglasses
  • Sun hat (B)
  • Warm hat
  • Headphones
  • Walkie-talkies (B)
  • Bike repair kit (tubes, air, multi-tool, tire levers, etc.) (B)
  • Rain jacket (B)
  • Travel bottles of Dr. Bronners/shampoo.
  • Hand degreaser (gojo, etc.) (B)
  • Pocket knife/Leatherman
  • Chain lube. I recommend the multi-use version of these.
  • Zip ties. Lots and lots of zip ties. (B)
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Lake Fort Smith – Kayak Review – Vapor 10 XT

Old Towne Canoe Vapor 10XT

vapor10xtPROS:

  • Easy enough to move around (50 pounds).
  • Very stable.
  • Tracks well. Not much waggle at all.
  • Solid handles.
  • Fast enough (4-4.5 mph).
  • Milk crate rod holder fits perfectly in front of cockpit, even better if you trim the crate handle on one side to slide under front “cupholder” (which is not really a cupholder, because it’s too far away. Lure holder?)

CONS:

  • Seat not the best, but not awful.
  • Low sides means rough water gets in. Need spray skirt for anything other than light-medium water.
  • Rear compartment just the wrong size for my cooler. 🙂
  • No front webbing (easy to install though).
  • Legs will get sunburned with open cockpit.
  • Weird drain plug location.

 

(from Wikipedia): Lake Fort Smith State Park is a 260-acre (110 ha) Arkansas state park in Crawford County, Arkansas in the United States. Originally a Fort Smith city park in the 1930s and later the Works Progress Administration-built Mountainburg Recreational Facility, the lake nestled in the Boston Mountains was adopted into the state park system by theArkansas Department of Parks and Tourism in 1967.[2] Lake Fort Smith State Park was closed in 2002 to make way for a larger dam and spillway. The addition flooded the site of the old park, and the new 260 acre Lake Fort Smith State Park reopened May 21, 2008 four miles north of its original location with 30 camp sites, 10 cabins, a group lodging facility, picnic sites, a pavilion, marina with rental boats, a double lane boat ramp, a swimming pool, playground, and an 8,000 square foot visitor center with exhibit gallery, gift shop, a meeting/class room, a patio with an outdoor wood burning fireplace, and an expansive view of the lake and mountains.[3]

Lake Fort Smith State Park is a 260-acre (110 ha) Arkansas state park in Crawford County, Arkansas in the United States. Originally a Fort Smith city park in the 1930s and later the Works Progress Administration-built Mountainburg Recreational Facility, the lake nestled in the Boston Mountains was adopted into the state park system by the Arkansas Department of Parks and Tourism in 1967.[2] Lake Fort Smith State Park was closed in 2002 to make way for a larger dam and spillway. The addition flooded the site of the old park, and the new 260 acre Lake Fort Smith State Park reopened May 21, 2008 four miles north of its original location with 30 camp sites, 10 cabins, a group lodging facility, picnic sites, a pavilion, marina with rental boats, a double lane boat ramp, a swimming pool, playground, and an 8,000 square foot visitor center with exhibit gallery, gift shop, a meeting/class room, a patio with an outdoor wood burning fireplace, and an expansive view of the lake and mountains.[3]

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RAGBRAI

It’s been a while since a) I have posted in this dusty attic of a blog, or b) I’ve done an epic outdoorsy activity. Sailing trips kinda count for the latter, because there is a lot of snorkeling involved. We have also done some cool hikes in the Northwest. At the end of the day, however, there was always a warm bed and a hot meal.1931003_46307329438_3231_n

For the record, I like warm beds and hot meals. Occasionally, though, it can be fun to test your limits and challenge yourself physically. For that reason, I’ve signed up for “the oldest, largest and longest bicycle touring event in the world,” or, as some people call it, RAGBRAI. Yup, me and 10,000 other crazy people (or as many as 23,000 on certain legs of the journey) will traverse the Great State of Iowa from west to east, covering nearly 500 miles in 7-ish days in July.

Google the event, and you’ll see photo evidence of why it’s sometimes called a “Mardi Gras on wheels.” Every little town has festivals and food, and people dress up in zany costumes and festoonery. I don’t have a costume, or even a team, but whichever lunatics I’m able to convince to do this with me are bound to come up with something. I’ll be riding my Bachetta Giro-20 recumbent bike, so that’s likely to be Dr. Seuss-y enough for most people. Recumbent riders in general have no shame.

So, back to the blog thing. I plan on posting my training notes and general thoughts on getting ready for RAGBRAI here, instead of on Facebook. Facebook gets noisy with people’s middle-aged demonstrations of feats of strength and endurance. At least, it does for me. My stuff will be way more interesting, of course. Stay tuned for posts about tires.

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An INTP Profile

I recently participated in a series of management assessment tests that included a Meyers-Briggs component. The last time I took this test was the 11th grade. Apparently, I am still an INTP: “INTPs are about 1% of the general population, making this one of the rarest of types.” I guess I should be proud?

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@jackpate – First Tweet!

Fun fact: I’ve had the @arkansas handle on Twitter longer than I’ve had @jackpate (March 2007 vs June 2008, respectively). Not wanting to rush into things, I finally “activated” the @jackpate handle last week, with a specific purpose in mind. I use the @arkansas handle for a lot of professional stuff–link sharing, conferences, lists, etc. As I have become more active on this channel, it feels a little weird to post pictures of my cat and lunch there. So, for cat and lunch pictures, head over to @jackpate.

Making this switch made me realize some things about the way I use social media. First, the way I interact with my “real life” friends is different than my professional network. On Facebook, it’s easier to keep content separated by choosing which people see what. Twitter is different, obviously, so it makes sense to have separate streams of content for personal and public consumption. It also prevents the awkwardness of being bombarded with 100 tweets about #lookatmeimatasocialmediaconference.

Secondly, it made me aware of the way I use different image platforms. For me, Instagram is for casual/odd/interesting stuff. Flickr is for more personal content, such as vacations or family. This is another way I have split up the content for now (at least, until Instagram lets you pick which Twitter account to share to). I’m curious to see how this works out.

 

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The Olde Blogge

It’s been more than three years since I posted here. That’s more than 100 years in Internet time. In fact, the last time I used WordPress as a personal platform, blogrolls were still part of the CMS.

I sense a return to blogging, though, and not just for me (that may never happen). Platforms like Facebook and Twitter are continually moving the cheese for audiences. As a result, big brands suffer, because, frankly, their content is crap, and every engagement algorithm that makes any sense hides crap from users. Pay-for-play remains the primary strategy, then, for commercial content.

Even as brands are willing to pay the ride ticket for their commercial messages, however, people with good content are getting lost in the noise. Average Good Guy Facebooker doesn’t have the budget to compete, much less navigate the changing currents of engagement rates and audience overstimulation.

So, a return to blogs? Maybe so. A good blog lives on forever in its own space. Mediocre ones do, too, apparently.

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